Civil Engineering Magazine THE MAGAZINE OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS
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    web article
    Report: Now is Time to Waterproof the World
    Jun 28 2016
    By Lynn Novelli

    A report by the World Bank warns that we should prepare now to mitigate climate change-induced water scarcity by 2035 or prepare to pay the human, environmental, and economic price.

    web article
    Alexandria, Virginia, Nears End of Long-Term Effort to Reduce Nitrogen Levels
    Jun 28 2016
    By Jay Landers

    Recently completed facilities for managing nutrient levels within its secondary treatment operations and pretreating centrate will help the city comply with stringent discharge limits for nitrogen in its wastewater.

    web article
    Coal Ash Sites Leak into Surface Water and Groundwater
    Jun 28 2016
    By Laurie A. Shuster

    Recent research from Duke reveals that coal ash ponds used by power producers to store the by-products of coal combustion in five southeastern states are leaking effluents with contaminants into surrounding waters.

    web article
    Persistent Social Influences Discourage Women from Engineering Careers
    Jun 21 2016
    By Laurie A. Shuster

    An analysis of journals kept by engineering students reveals that negative work experiences often discourage women in their pursuit of engineering careers.

    web article
    Gender Affects Levels of Math Anxiety
    Jun 21 2016
    By Kevin Wilcox

    Research finds that female students experience more anxiety about mathematics courses than their performance would suggest.

    web article
    Using Spores to Harness Evaporation
    Jun 21 2016
    By Kevin Wilcox

    Researchers at Columbia University have developed engines that use the expansion and contraction of spores to generate electricity.