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ASCE Week - A Continuing Education Event - Orlando

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ASCE Week 2015 - A Continuing Education Event
Orlando, FL
March 16-20, 2015
Wyndham Lake Buena Vista Resort

Not able to attend ASCE Week Orlando? Attend ASCE Week Las Vegas being held in September of 2014!

ASCE Week highlights ASCE’s most popular face-to-face seminars from leading experts in one location.

Schedule and Seminars - Earn up to 36 PDHs to meet your license renewal requirements.
Discounted Registration Fees - Save up to $800 on regular seminar prices when you register by February 20, 2015 for two seminars.
Special Tour! - Special mid-week Private Custom Disney Tour.
Hotel Information - Spacious accommodations at an official Walt Disney World® Hotel, the Wyndham Lake Buena Vista Resort.   

ASCE Week Seminar Schedule and Seminar Titles

Register Now

Below is the list of seminar titles featured at ASCE Week. Click on the title to read more about each course and register.

Monday, March 16 - Tuesday, March 17
   CM-at-Risk: Contracting for Owners, Consulting Engineers, and ContractorsNEW 
   Construction Dewatering and Groundwater Control: Design and Application
   Design of Concrete PavementsNEW 
   Industrial Buildings: Design and RenovationNEW 
   Water Hammer in Transmission and Distribution Systems
   Wind Loads for Buildings and Other Structures
 
Wednesday, March 18
   Special mid-week Private Custom Disney Tour 
    **Due to space limitations, this field trip is only available to ASCE Week attendees and their guests.  
 
Thursday,March 19 - Friday, March 20
   Designing Nonbuilding Structures Using ASCE/SEI 7-10NEWLY UPDATED
   Financial Management for the Professional Engineer
   Seismic Analysis of Structures and EquipmentNEW 
   Soil and Rock Slope Stability
   Techniques for Pavement Rehabilitation

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Seminar Descriptions and Instructors

CM-at-Risk: Contracting for Owners, Consulting Engineers, and Contractors —NEW
Monday, March 16 - Tuesday, March 17
Instructor - Douglas D. Gransberg, Ph.D., P.E., CCE, FRICS, M.ASCE

In the past decade, the pressure to deliver construction projects at a faster pace has grown and with it has come the use of alternative project delivery methods that furnish the ability to overlap the design and the construction process, thus compressing the project delivery period. Each of these methods has its advantages and its disadvantages. It is critical that engineers, architects and owners understand the fundamentals of each method and how it can potentially impact the quality of both the design and the construction. Each has its own technical distinctions, contractual models and potential ethical challenges. Hence, an early step in most capital project development processes is to decide which project delivery method is best suited for the given project. When a project's success depends on the construction contractor's means and methods, owners and their consultants need to get early contractor involvement in design and select some a method that retains a construction manager (CM) in some capacity to preform preconstruction services during design.

This seminar will boil each project delivery method down into its essential components from concept through design to construction and discuss the relative benefits and potential pitfalls of each. Case studies from current project delivery method research by the instructor will be presented to synthesize the theory that will be presented and illustrate its implementation.
Full course details and registration.
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Construction Dewatering and Groundwater Control: Design and Application
Monday, March 16 - Tuesday, March 17
Instructors - Paul C. Schmall, P.E., M.ASCE and Gregory M. Landry, P.E., M.ASCE

Groundwater control is a significant issue with all underground construction. Water affects the design of the structure, the construction procedures, and overall project costs. Groundwater is the single most significant source of delays, claims, and litigation in the underground construction industry. Determining the most effective solution to a groundwater issue will be enhanced if engineers and contractors are up to date in their understanding of groundwater phenomena, the methods of identifying and analyzing site-specific situations, and the tools available to control those situations.

This seminar will present the variety of dewatering and groundwater control methods available, including recent developments. Both theory and practice will be discussed, the latter based on actual case histories presented.

Groundwater, and how best to address its potential impact on underground construction, is not generally well understood outside of a limited specialty arena. Through this seminar, industry professionals will gain a greater knowledge and practical understanding of this important topic and how to apply that knowledge to minimize risk and to benefit the design and construction of future underground projects.

Topics covered will include the conditions where different dewatering methods are effective, site subsurface investigation appropriate for dewatering projects; including pumping tests, analysis and design of dewatering systems using analytical methods, installation and operation considerations, grouting and other passive cut-off methods, side effects from dewatering, and practical applications of dewatering for construction and remediation of contaminated sites. 
Full course details and registration.
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Design of Concrete Pavements —NEW
Monday, March 16 - Tuesday, March 17
Instructors - Brian Killingsworth, P.E. and Amanda Hult

Concrete pavements may be used in a variety of applications including highways, streets, and parking lots. By using suitable design techniques and appropriate details a designer can develop an economic and sustainable concrete pavement cross section that will perform for many years.

This seminar will provide instruction on how to design and detail concrete pavements used in highways, streets, and parking lots by considering the traffic loads, soil conditions, and resulting pavement stresses. In addition to designing conventional concrete pavements, this seminar will provide introductions to innovative products such as pervious concrete, concrete overlays and roller compacted concrete.

Concrete thickness design will be presented from multiple design methodologies which includes both empirical and mechanistic-empirical procedures. Discussions of subgrade characterization and improvement as well as pavement jointing will also be provided. Concrete materials will be presented including discussions on strength, workability and durability. Additional detail will be provided on economic life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) and environmental life cycle assessment (LCA) of concrete pavements. Typical construction techniques for conventional concrete pavements and overlay as well as the unique techniques used for pervious and roller compacted concrete will be reviewed. Development and application of materials and construction specifications and the related quality control and acceptance tests will be highlighted in terms of meeting the design objectives.

This course is intended for civil engineers, geotechnical engineers, and public works officials involved in the design and layout of concrete highways, streets, and parking areas. Participants will leave the course with a better understanding of the analytical process used to achieve an optimized concrete pavement cross section that will perform as intended over the design life. 
Full course details and registration. 
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Industrial Buildings: Design and Renovation —NEW
Monday, March 16 - Tuesday, March 17
Instructor - Alexander Newman, P.E., F.ASCE

Industrial buildings are used for a variety of manufacturing processes, as well as for storage of raw materials and finished goods. Structural design of these buildings involves some issues that are not present in other types of construction. Most large design and construction companies specializing in industrial buildings have developed in-house standards and protocols to guide their employees, but this information is not available to the general engineering community. In addition, many industrial buildings use proprietary structural systems, and building designers must be intimately familiar with these systems to arrive at cost-effective solutions.

The presentation sheds some light on the common practical challenges in the design of industrial buildings. The first part of the seminar explores the design for new construction, including typical framing systems, design of crane runway beams and crane supports, foundations for building structures and equipment, anchors and embedments, and design for serviceability. The second part deals with renovation of industrial buildings, including such topics as code analysis, strengthening of framing for vertical loads, wind and seismic retrofit, and foundation strengthening. The issues of building expansion and rehabilitation of the building envelope are addressed as well. The audience is encouraged to ask questions throughout the presentation, and the seminar concludes with the final Questions and Answers opportunity.  
Full course details and registration.
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Water Hammer in Transmission and Distribution Systems
Monday, March 16 - Tuesday, March 17
Instructors -  E. Benjamin Wylie, Ph.D., P.E., F. ASCE and Jim C.P. Liou, Ph.D., P.E., M. ASCE

Water hammer may endanger pipeline equipment and may compromise personal safety. What causes water hammer? How can these conditions be anticipated, predicted and modeled? Is it possible to reduce the severity of these conditions through proper design or control?

This course emphasizes the development of an understanding of unsteady liquid pipeline flows with a particular emphasis on wave propagation phenomena. Care is given to concepts that distinguish normal unsteady flow events from more rapid undesirable events. Numerical modeling techniques are developed and demonstrated by solving practical problems encountered in water supply, sewerage and storm water transmission, power, and oil industries.

Lectures, real-life examples, demonstrations, and problem solving, comprise the format of the course. Topics include: concepts of transient flow, basic equations related to physical behavior, numerical modeling, system schematization, time scales, column separation, gaseous cavitation, control concepts including valve operation, air chambers and surge tanks, pumps, system time constants, and resonance.

With their extensive experience in research, consulting, software development, and teaching, the instructors offer a practical, understandable course that should enable participants to recognize, analyze, simulate, and solve problems related to unsteady flows in pipeline systems.  
Full course details and registration.   
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Wind Loads for Buildings and Other Structures
Monday, March 16 - Tuesday, March 17
Instructor - Jon D. Raggett, Ph.D., P.E., S.E., M.ASCE

Hurricanes Andrew (1992), Iniki (1992), Hugo (1989), four hurricanes of 2004, hurricanes Katrina, Rita and Wilma of 2005 and the Kansas-Oklahoma tornado outbreaks (1999 & 2003) were catastrophic demonstrations of the increasing vulnerability of buildings and other structures (tanks, signs, towers, etc.) to severe wind storms. Wind induced property losses now annually exceed the sum of all other losses from natural hazards.

This seminar addresses wind effects, provides guidelines for assessing design wind loads for buildings and other structures, and offers a discussion of the advantages of wind tunnel testing. This seminar is based on the ASCE publications Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures (ASCE 7-10) and Significant Changes to the Wind Provisions of ASCE 7-10. While much of the instruction focuses on assessing wind loads, a portion of the seminar is directed to review wind damage experience of the past thirty years and lessons learned from the experience. Discussion in the seminar will focus on the new ASCE 7-10 Standard.

DAY ONE of this seminar is devoted to a comprehensive review of basic wind engineering fundamentals and the background of the wind load provisions of the national standard, ASCE 7- 10.

DAY TWO focuses on the application of national standard ASCE 7-10 with hands-on experience gained by working through a number of examples utilizing provisions of ASCE 7-10. A portion of the day includes going beyond the standards, with discussion of the determination of site specific wind speed, and wind tunnel testing.  
Full course details and registration.   
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Designing Nonbuilding Structures Using ASCE/SEI 7-10NEWLY UPDATED
Thursday, March 19 - Friday, March 20
Instructor - Dave K. Adams, P.E., S.E., M.ASCE

This seminar will provide tools for a practicing engineer to design efficient non-building structures, using the requirements of ASCE/SEI 7-10 as a base document for determining wind and seismic forces. Some of this efficiency comes with an ability to recognize the limitations of prescriptive code requirements and to produce a defensible design using time-tested principles of engineering mechanics.. Sometimes alternate designs that may not specifically comply with the letter of the code need to be investigated in such a way that the understood intent of the code will be met. Practical design examples will be used throughout the seminar to illustrate discussed principles.
Full course details and registration.
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Financial Management for the Professional Engineer
Thursday, March 19 - Friday, March 20
Instructor - David M. Wahby

It is not uncommon for engineering firm principals, project managers and technical staff to become confused and handcuffed when confronted with firm financial matters. After all, you were trained as an engineer, not an accountant. This program is designed to peel away the layers of mystery and provide you with the necessary basics - specifically as they pertain to engineering firm management. You will return to your office energized by new found financial skills, increased confidence, and a set of simple yet powerful tools and procedures you will use day in and day out to understand and manage your firm.
Full course details and registration.
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Seismic Analysis of Structures and Equipment —NEW

Thursday, March 19 - Friday, March 20
Instructor - Praveen K. Malhotra, Ph.D., P.E., M.ASCE

Structures (and equipment) are analyzed to identify their vulnerabilities to seismic ground shaking. The analysis is carried out by applying ground motions to a mathematical model of the structure. The ground motions are defined by their response spectra or time-histories. The structure is modeled by a lumped or distributed-mass system. The non-linearities are explicitly modeled or empirically considered. As a result, there are many different methods of analyzing a structure. The objectives of this seminar are: (a) to discuss the pros and cons of different methods of analysis; and (b) to provide an understanding of the dynamic response of structures such that the most appropriate method of analysis can be selected and the most efficient design can be generated.  
Full course details and registration.
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Soil and Rock Slope Stability
Thursday, March 19 - Friday, March 20
Instructors - Sunil Sharma, Ph.D., P.E., M.ASCE and Stanley M. Miller, Ph.D., P.E., M.ASCE

Landslides and slope failures are responsible for millions of dollars of damage to public and private property every year. The primary factors driving this trend include aging slopes constructed for major transportation systems in the U.S. during the 1950s and 1960s and the ever-increasing need to develop land on steep natural slopes and fills for public and private purposes. Because slopes consist of native or transported earth materials, engineering properties and behaviors are quite variable and unpredictable to precise limits. This variability is compounded by the frequent presence and influence of surface water runoff and groundwater infiltration that often trigger landslide movements. Today, the analysis and solution of landslide problems as well as the prevention of landslide problems requires an understanding of geology, hydrology, seismology, geotechnical exploration and engineering, computerized analytical methods, and practical and constructible engineering solutions.The seminar will target three main areas of interest related to slopes: collecting and evaluating geologic and geotechnical data, analytical methods for soil and rock slopes, and stabilization methods. This two-day seminar will concentrate on the collection of input data and the subsequent analyses required to assess the stability of soil and rock slopes through the use of hands-on, computer based activities.  
Full course details and registration.    
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Techniques for Pavement Rehabilitation
Thursday, March 19 - Friday, March 20
Instructors - Newton C. Jackson, P.E. and James M. Signore, Ph.D., P.E.

This seminar provides detailed information on the quality standards for pavement rehabilitation. It includes the concepts that assist pavement engineers in developing the most reliable and cost-effective rehabilitation alternatives for existing flexible and rigid pavements. It addresses the problem of rehabilitation for both pavement types in a logical sequence: existing pavement structural evaluation and condition assessment, distress mechanisms, needs assessment, assignment of feasible alternatives from four categories of reconstruction, restoration, recycling, and resurfacing (4R), selection of preferred alternatives, overall design and construction. The reference material provided contains information useful in identifying potential problems and providing specific solutions, while understanding the effects on the final rehabilitated pavement. The seminar combines lectures and workshop sessions to provide participants with hands-on experience with the techniques for pavement rehabilitation.   
Full course details and registration. 
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ASCE Week 2013 Disney Tour

 Private Custom Disney Tour
 Wednesday, March 18, 2015

  **Due to space limitations, this field trip is only available
    to ASCE Week attendees and their guests.     

 
  Register Now     


Unlock the fascinating history of Magic Kingdom park and gain backstage access to legendary hidden areas.This walking tour explores the creation and remarkable growth of one of the most beloved parks at Walt Disney World Resort. Explore secret locations you have always wondered about and get the inside scoop on some of your favorite attractions. During your tour:

  • Uncover the hidden secrets of classic attractions at Magic Kingdom park.
  • Access the famed underground “Utilidor” tunnels that allow people and supplies to travel beneath the park unseen.
  • Discover little-known facts, trivia and other exciting tidbits about the park.
  • Lunch
  • Earn 4 PDHs 

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Special ASCE Week Reduced Registration Fees

Registration Type with Codes
EARLY BIRD RATE
(Registration by
February 20, 2015)
ASCE WEEK RATE
(Registration after
February 20, 2015)
Member Nonmember Member Nonmember
 1 Seminar - $150 Discount
 Use Discount Code: ASCEWK150  
$1,065 $1,295 $1,215 $1,445
 2 Seminars - $500 Discount
 Use Discount Code: ASCEWK500
$1,930 $2,390 $2,230 $2,690
 Disney Tour  
 $225 per person
**Due to space limitations, this field trip is only available to
attendees attending an ASCE Week seminar and their guests.
 

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Hotel Information

Wyndham Lake Buena Vista Resort
1850 Hotel Plaza Blvd.
Lake Buena Vista, FL 32830

Reserve your room today!
Call (407) 828-4444 to reserve your room.

Room rates are:

    Tower Rooms:                    $119 per night plus a $13 resort fee and tax for single/double occupancy
    Sunrise/Sunset Rooms:     $109 per night plus a $13 resort fee and tax for single/double occupancy
     **Rates are based upon availability through Friday, February 27, 2015.


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Not able to attend ASCE Week Orlando? Attend ASCE Week Las Vegas being held in September of 2014!