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2007 New Faces of Civil Engineering

 

 

ASCE has named 10 dynamic, young engineers as the 2007 New Faces of Civil Engineering. ASCE sponsors the New Faces of Civil Engineering program as a part of the National Engineers Week New Faces of Engineering program, which recognizes outstanding young engineers from all engineering disciplines. Both programs shine the spotlight of achievement on accomplished young engineers, highlighting their professional contributions and impact on society, as well as putting a face on what has been referred to as "the stealth profession."



/uploadedImages/Diversity_-_New/alonso.jpgMarta Alonso
By teaching inspectors construction-related Spanish, Marta Alonso, a civil engineer with URS Corporation in Hunt Valley, Md., is helping to increase overall safety on the $2.45-billion Woodrow Wilson Bridge Project.

Currently serving as an environmental engineer, this 26-year-old is working as the permit manager with the environmental compliance team on the new Wilson Bridge—a project designed to ease congestion through the Maryland, Washington, D.C., and Virginia connection—where she maintains more than 30 permits issued by 12 regulatory and resource agencies. She also manages the extensive water quality monitoring program and assists with the successful implementation and monitoring of the $60-million compensatory mitigation package. Alonso earned her bachelor's in civil engineering in 2002, and a master's degree in environmental engineering in 2003 from Johns Hopkins University.

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/uploadedImages/Diversity_-_New/andrade.jpgJose Andrade
From a small village in Ecuador to a teaching position with Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill., Jose Andrade traveled to the United States with the determination to succeed. Committed to excellence in teaching and research, this 27-year-old currently serves as an assistant professor in the university's Civil and Environmental Engineering Department. Andrade's responsibilities include developing new civil engineering and geomechanics courses, as well as developing mathematical and computational tools for modeling complex geo-systems.

Andrade previously served as a mentor for freshmen at Stanford University, as a student liaison to the Center for Teaching and Learning in Stanford, Calif., and as a Tau Beta Pi facilitator, helping undergraduates develop interpersonal, organizational and leadership skills. At the age of 18, Andrade received a scholarship to the Florida Institute of Technology, where he earned a bachelor's degree in civil engineering. In addition, he received a full fellowship to Stanford University, where he earned master's and doctorate degrees in geomechanics.

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/uploadedImages/Diversity_-_New/garbely.jpgDaniel Garbely
Growing up in countries like Nepal, Indonesia and Romania, Daniel Garbely, a civil engineer with CH2M Hill in Portland, Ore., was exposed firsthand to the vast number of people who do not have access to clean water, sanitation or shelter. As a result, Garbely, who specializes in water/wastewater projects, devotes his expertise to helping provide these basic human resources worldwide.

This 28-year-old serves as a water expert on the Engineers Without Borders (EWB) Technical Advisory Committee and as the country liaison for all EWB-USA projects in El Salvador. In addition, Garbely served as the first regional president of EWB-USA, helping the organization grow from a single chapter in Colorado to a nation-wide network of more than 200 student and professional chapters. He has led teams of students and practicing engineers on projects in Thailand and El Salvador to improve access to quality water in poor rural communities, and he is responsible for the development of various water resources guidelines and training programs. Garbely earned his bachelor's and master's degrees in civil and environmental engineering from California Polytechnic State University.

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/uploadedImages/Diversity_-_New/kepke.jpgJacqueline Kepke
The events of Sept. 11 exposed the vulnerability of our nation's infrastructure to the threat of terrorism. Since then, Jacqueline Kepke, a civil engineer with CH2M HILL, has been working to protect our nation's water and wastewater systems.

Currently serving as a project technologist with CH2M HILL, this 29-year-old has developed a curriculum to teach water utilities around the country to assess the vulnerabilities of their systems and to improve their emergency response planning. In addition, Kepke adapted the curriculum to develop two hands-on training programs for water systems in California. Kepke earned her bachelor's and master's degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Stanford University. A long-time resident of San Francisco, she recently relocated to Sydney, Australia.

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/uploadedImages/Diversity_-_New/lee.jpgMatthew Lee
When you look around the city of Brisbane, Calif., you can see the direct impact Matthew Lee's work has had on the local community.

Currently serving as an associate civil engineer with the City of Brisbane, Calif., this 26-year-old recently implemented a five-year pavement maintenance program that has significantly increased the city's overall pavement condition index. In addition, Lee managed projects that improved the community, such as construction of a dog park, a community garden, a basketball court, at-grade crossings for a walking trail and a public restroom. His efforts have also included the addition of a solar thermal heating system for the community pool, an emergency operations radio system and a handicap ramp transition plan. A licensed professional engineer in California, Lee earned a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from the University of California-Davis and is completing his final semester for a master's degree in structural/earthquake engineering from San Francisco State University.

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/uploadedImages/Diversity_-_New/pagano.jpgThomas Pagano
For Thomas Pagano, a 24-year-old with Sam Schwartz Engineering, PLLC in New York, civil engineering is a walk in the park. Specializing in the field of pedestrian engineering, Pagano's responsibilities include pedestrian signalization techniques, traffic calming and crosswalk design applications. This research will culminate in the release of a pedestrian engineering book, the first on the subject since the mid 1970s.

Pagano also previously worked on a landmark project analyzing the possibility of rebuilding the World Trade Center towers as they were in the 1970s with the transportation infrastructure of today. This work consisted of analyzing the existing transportation system, including the harbors and roadways, to determine if the massive construction pieces could be transported to the site. Pagano earned a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art.

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/uploadedImages/Diversity_-_New/schreifels.jpgChelan Schreifels
While raising her daughter—now 10 years old—29-year-old Chelan Schreifels also earned bachelor's and master's degrees in civil engineering, began working as a civil engineer with the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) at Elmendorf Air Force Base in Alaska, and served as a volunteer in disaster relief efforts after Hurricane Ivan devastated the Gulf Coast. Currently employed with the USACE, Schreifels has successfully led multidisciplinary teams on projects including stream bank erosion, coastal erosion, flood damage reduction and watershed studies. In addition, she has served as a civil works planner, assisting communities to plan federal water resources projects.

She is an active volunteer for youth programs such as National Engineer's Week and Outdoor Week—a science based program for sixth grade students sponsored by the Bureau of Land Management—and she served as a mentor at the Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) for an all-girl Lego-robotics club. Schreifels earned a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from the University of Alaska in Anchorage and is currently working on her master's degree.

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/uploadedImages/Diversity_-_New/smith.jpgKirin Smith
Coordinating design efforts for the Anacostia Streetcar Project in Washington, D.C., allowed Kirin Smith the opportunity to give back in a meaningful way to her community. Currently serving as a civil engineer with the Mid-Atlantic regional office of Delon Hampton & Associates in Silver Spring, Md., this 24-year-old recently coordinated design efforts for the initial phases of alignment and station design for the Streetcar Project—a pilot project that will provide much needed transit improvement services to thousands of community residents and employees of the Bolling Air Force Base.

She currently serves as outreach director of the ASCE National Capital Section Younger Member Group, a group providing opportunities for ASCE members 35 years of age and younger to network, share ideas, enhance professional development, learn industry leadership skills, forge career connections and increase the visibility of the profession among students in grades K-12. Smith earned a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from Howard University in Washington, D.C.

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/uploadedImages/Diversity_-_New/travers.jpgPatrick Travers
From the high-rise skyline in Chicago, to poverty stricken communities in Peru, Patrick Travers works to improve the quality of life worldwide. This 24-year-old, a civil engineer with the Christian Life Movement—an organization dedicated to helping the poor, working with youth and evangelizing culture—was previously employed with Halvorson & Partners, S.E.

As a part of his work on several design projects for high-rise buildings in Chicago, Travers has designed lateral and gravity systems for concrete residential buildings up to 500 feet tall, and has taken on the role of specialist in the design of reinforced concrete floor slabs. He currently serves as a mentor with the Architecture, Construction and Engineering (ACE) mentoring program, guiding Chicago high school students in the pursuit of careers in the construction industry.

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/uploadedImages/Diversity_-_New/williams.jpgWayne Williams
Wayne Williams comes to work every day at Washington Dulles International Airport with money on his mind. BIG MONEY. This 29-year-old, a civil engineer with Delon Hampton and Associates in Washington, D.C., manages the documentation for 10 multi-million dollar contracts at the airport. These projects include the $260-million tunnel and automated people mover, the $216-million new fourth runway and the $42-million airport traffic control tower, as well as the upgrades and renovations to various terminals, facilities and runways.

Williams also performs a variety of other support functions for the $6-billion airport modernization and renovation program. He earned a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and a master's degree in civil infrastructure engineering from George Mason University. In addition, Williams earned a bachelor's degree in physics from Lincoln University.

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/uploadedImages/Diversity_-_New/yellowhair.jpgMerwin Yellowhair
Merwin Yellowhair's home on the Diné Nation in northern Arizona had few engineer role models, but that fact only steeled his resolve to change the situation for the better. Yellowhair, a civil engineer with AmericaBuilt Development in Tucson, Ariz., was determined to show civil engineering as a career option for his family and community members, and used every available resource to acquire his bachelor's and master's degrees in engineering, and become a principal of a registered engineering firm, all while under the age of 30.

Upon attaining his Professional Engineering license in 2006, Yellowhair registered AmericaBuilt Development, a separate engineering division within the AmericaBuilt Corporation, as a new and dynamic civil engineering firm in the state of Arizona. As chief engineer, Yellowhair currently manages the engineering division and collaborates with AmericaBuilt Construction with each in-house design. He earned bachelor's and master's degrees in civil engineering from Northern Arizona University. A second-generation college graduate and the first registered professional engineer in his family, Yellowhair is one of the few members of the Diné Nation to achieve this license.

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