Civil Engineering Magazine THE MAGAZINE OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS
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    web article
    Chinese Opera House Pays Homage to Wind-Sculpted Landscapes
    Feb 02 2016
    By Catherine A. Cardno, Ph.D.

    The completed opera house in Harbin, China--a city in the country's northeast--offers fluid, undulating curves both inside and out.

    web article
    New York is Home to the 1st and 100th Supertall Tower
    Feb 02 2016
    By Kevin Wilcox

    The reasons why developers build supertall towers hasn't changed much in 85 years, but how they are designed and built has advanced significantly.

    web article
    EPA Says U.S. Requires Significant Spending on Wastewater Infrastructure
    Feb 02 2016
    By Catherine A. Cardno, Ph.D.

    The EPA reported to Congress that the United States needs to spend $271 billion over the course of 20 years to maintain and improve wastewater systems in order to protect health and safety.

    web article
    Team Develops Martian Concrete with Significant Implications for Terrestrial Construction
    Jan 19 2016
    By Kevin Wilcox

    Working with a substance that simulates Martian soil, a team at Northwestern University develops a strong sulfur concrete with intriguing possibilities for construction on two worlds.

    web article
    Designing Infrastructure for Fast Growth in Texas
    Jan 19 2016
    By Kevin Wilcox

    The City of Conroe, which has nearly doubled in size in the past 15 years, plans an innovative wastewater treatment plant to manage future demand.

    web article
    Seismic Waves Harnessed to Map Weakened Crustal Areas
    Jan 19 2016
    By Catherine A. Cardno, Ph.D.

    Weakened areas of the earth's crust at which pressure from fluid buildup has fractured rocks could prove to be flash points for future earthquakes.