received his BS degree from Brigham Young University and his Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley. After working as a geotechnical consultant, he joined the civil engineering faculty at BYU in 1987, following after his father who was previously a geotechnical professor. His research has involved geotechnical earthquake engineering, deep foundation and bridge abutment behavior, and soil improvement techniques. His work typically involves full-scale testing to evaluate and improve performance of bridges and buildings. The American Society of Civil Engineers has recognized his work with the Huber research award, the Wellington prize, and the Wallace Hayward Baker award. In 2009, he was the Cross-Canada Geotechnical lecturer for the Canadian Geotechnical Society.