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Civil Engineering Magazine THE MAGAZINE OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS
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    CEMagazineApr19

    This month in Civil Engineering

    Features:

    In Every Issue:

    • News
    • Next Step
    • Policy Briefing
    • President's Note
    • The Law

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    FEATURES THIS MONTH

    web article

    Storage for One More Century

    Apr - 2019

    By Edwin Friend, P.E., P.G., PMP, Blaine Dwyer, P.E., M.ASCE, D.WRE, and Casey Dick, P.E., PMP

    Since its completion more than a century ago by a previous owner, Denver Water's Antero Dam has experienced seepage problems, forcing the utility to limit the storage capacity of the associated reservoir. After the completion of a carefully planned four-phase dam and spillway rehabilitation project, the newly revamped Antero Dam is expected to operate safely for another 100 years.

    web article

    Uplifted

    Apr - 2019

    By Sean-Philip Bolduc, P.E., Thomas Spoth, P.E., and Bradley C. Touchstone, AIA

    The new Fore River Bridge, near Boston, leaves more room vertically and horizontally for passing ships, and its lift towers employ several cost-saving innovations.




    In Every Issue

    A Question of Ethics scales
    Apr-2019

    In today’s professional environment, it is increasingly common for engineers to find themselves moving to new cities, regions, or even countries in search of better opportunities for professional advancement. A significant relocation often requires adapting to a host of unfamiliar social and cultural norms. In light of this, one might question whether the same holds true of professional ethics--whether the ethical principles that govern an engineer’s conduct are consistent across the globe, or if they, too, are subject to regional or cultural differences.

    A Question of Ethics

    HL April 2019 Thumbnail
    Apr-2019

    The USS Maine was always something of a cursed vessel. According to How the Battleship Maine was Destroyed, by U.S. Navy Adm. Hyman G. Rickover (published by the Navy's Naval History Division in 1976), the battleship "had caught fire while under construction; it had run aground in February, 1896; five men were washed overboard off Cape Hatteras [North Carolina] on February 6, 1897 (only two were recovered); and two men were injured two days later when a piece of ammunition exploded."

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